Ackee

Les fruits d'ackee non mûrs qui poussent sur cet arbre en Jamaïque sont toxiques dans cet état.
Catégories : Plantes médicinales
Blighia_sapida (Wikipedia)

Blighia sapida
Ackee 001.jpg
Fruit
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Clade:Rosids
Order:Sapindales
Family:Sapindaceae
Genus:Blighia
Species:
B. sapida
Binomial name
Blighia sapida
Synonyms

Cupania sapida Voigt

Ackee
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
10 g
Dietary fiber3.45 g
19 g
9
VitaminsQuantity %DV
Thiamine (B1)
9%
0.10 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
15%
.18 mg
Niacin (B3)
25%
3.74 mg
Vitamin C
82%
68 mg
MineralsQuantity %DV
Iron
42%
5.52 mg

Raw arils after pods allowed to open naturally. Seeds removed
Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.

The ackee, also known as ankye, achee, akee, ackee apple or ayee (Blighia sapida) is a fruit of the Sapindaceae soapberry family, as are the lychee and the longan. It is native to tropical West Africa. The scientific name honours Captain William Bligh who took the fruit from Jamaica to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, England in 1793. The English common name is derived from the West African Akan akye fufo.

Although having a long-held reputation as being poisonous with potential fatalities, the fruit arils are renowned as delicious when ripe, prepared properly, and cooked, and are a feature of various Caribbean cuisines. Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica and is considered a delicacy.

Ackee (Wiktionary)

English

Alternative forms

  • achee, akee

Etymology

From Akan akye.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈækiː/, /əˈkiː/
  • Rhymes: -iː (one pronunciation)

Noun

ackee (plural ackees)

  1. A tropical evergreen tree, Blighia sapida, related to the lychee and longan.
    • 1883, Daniel Morris, The Colony of British Honduras, Its Resources and Prospects, London: Edward Stanford, Chapter 7, p. 113,[1]
      The beautiful Akee (Blighia sapida), originally brought from the West Coast of Africa by slave ships, is now a common tree in the West Indies, and I noticed several fine specimens in Belize.
...
« Retour à l'index du glossaire
Article précédentPomme de rose
Article suivantCherimoya