Goldenseal

Gros plan sur la fleur inhabituelle de la plante de l'hydraste du Canada.  Elle n'a pas de pétales, seulement des étamines
Catégories : Plantes médicinales
Goldenseal (Wikipedia)

Goldenseal
Hydrastis canadensis.jpg
Hydrastis canadensis
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Order:Ranunculales
Family:Ranunculaceae
Subfamily:Hydrastidoideae
Rafinesque, 1815
Genus:Hydrastis
L.
Species:
H. canadensis
Binomial name
Hydrastis canadensis

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis), also called orangeroot or yellow puccoon, is a perennial herb in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae, native to southeastern Canada and the eastern United States. It may be distinguished by its thick, yellow knotted rootstock. The stem is purplish and hairy above ground and yellow below ground where it connects to the yellow rhizome. Goldenseal reproduces both clonally through the rhizome and sexually, with clonal division more frequent than asexual reproduction. It takes between 4 and 5 years for a plant to reach sexual maturity, i.e. the point at which it produces flowers. Plants in the first stage, when the seed erupts and cotyledons emerge, can remain in this state one or more years. The second vegetative stage occurs during years two and three (and sometimes longer) and is characterized by the development of a single leaf and absence of a well developed stem. Finally, the third stage is reproductive, at which point flowering and fruiting occurs. This last stage takes between 4 and 5 years to develop.

A second species from Japan, previously listed as Hydrastis palmatum, is now usually classified in another genus, as Glaucidium palmatum.

Goldenseal (Wiktionary)

English

Etymology

golden +‎ seal

Noun

goldenseal (countable and uncountable, plural goldenseals)

  1. Hydrastis canadensis, a perennial herb of the buttercup family, native to southeastern Canada and the northeastern United States, with a thick, yellow knotted rootstock and diverse medicinal properties.

Synonyms

  • orangeroot
...
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