Grenade

Juicy pomegranate fruit with leaves  on a red background

Punica granatum

Pomegranate (Wikipedia)

Pomegranate
Pomegranate Juice (2019).jpg
Fruit of Punica granatum split open to reveal clusters of seeds on the inside sarcotesta, and a glass of juice
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Clade:Rosids
Order:Myrtales
Family:Lythraceae
Genus:Punica
Species:
P. granatum
Binomial name
Punica granatum
Synonyms
  • Punica florida Salisb.
  • Punica grandiflora hort. ex Steud.
  • Punica nana L.
  • Punica spinosa Lam.
Pomegranate fruit - whole and piece with arils

The pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub in the family Lythraceae, subfamily Punicoideae, that grows between 5 and 10 m (16 and 33 ft) tall.

Young pomegranate in Side, Turkey

The pomegranate was originally described throughout the Mediterranean region. It was introduced into Spanish America in the late 16th century and into California by Spanish settlers in 1769.

The fruit is typically in season in the Northern Hemisphere from October to February,[failed verification] and in the Southern Hemisphere from March to May. As intact sarcotestas or juice, pomegranates are used in baking, cooking, juice blends, meal garnishes, smoothies, and alcoholic beverages, such as cocktails and wine.

Pomegranates are widely cultivated throughout the Middle East and Caucasus region, north and tropical Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Central Asia, the drier parts of Southeast Asia, and the Mediterranean Basin.

Pomegranate (Wiktionary)

English

Etymology

From Middle English pome garnate, pome granate, borrowed from Old French pomme grenate, from Medieval Latin pōmum (fruit) + grānātum (having many seeds).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɒm.ɪˌɡɹæn.ɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɑm.ɪˌɡɹæn.ɪt/

Noun

pomegranate (plural pomegranates)

  1. A fruit-bearing shrub or small tree, Punica granatum.
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