Rhubarbe

Sour leaf culinair vegetable red rhubarb growing in garden

Rheum hybridum

Synonymes :
Da Huang
Rhubarb (Wikipedia)

Rhubarb
Rheum rhabarbarum.2006-04-27.uellue.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Order:Caryophyllales
Family:Polygonaceae
Genus:Rheum
Species:
R. × hybridum (?)
Binomial name
Rheum × hybridum (?)
Rhubarb, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy88 kJ (21 kcal)
4.54 g
Sugars1.1 g
Dietary fiber1.8 g
0.3 g
0.8 g
VitaminsQuantity %DV
Thiamine (B1)
2%
0.02 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
3%
0.03 mg
Niacin (B3)
2%
0.3 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5)
2%
0.085 mg
Vitamin B6
2%
0.024 mg
Folate (B9)
2%
7 μg
Choline
1%
6.1 mg
Vitamin C
10%
8 mg
Vitamin E
2%
0.27 mg
Vitamin K
28%
29.3 μg
MineralsQuantity %DV
Calcium
9%
86 mg
Iron
2%
0.22 mg
Magnesium
3%
12 mg
Manganese
9%
0.196 mg
Phosphorus
2%
14 mg
Potassium
6%
288 mg
Sodium
0%
4 mg
Zinc
1%
0.1 mg

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA FoodData Central

Rhubarb is the fleshy, edible stalks (petioles) of species and hybrids (culinary rhubarb) of Rheum in the family Polygonaceae, which are cooked and used for food. The whole plant – a herbaceous perennial growing from short, thick rhizomes – is also called rhubarb. Historically, different plants have been called "rhubarb" in English. The large, triangular leaves contain high levels of oxalic acid and anthrone glycosides, making them inedible. The small flowers are grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

The precise origin of culinary rhubarb is unknown. The species Rheum rhabarbarum (syn. R. undulatum) and R. rhaponticum were grown in Europe before the 18th century and used for medicinal purposes. By the early 18th century, these two species and a possible hybrid of unknown origin, R. × hybridum, were grown as vegetable crops in England and Scandinavia. They readily hybridize, and culinary rhubarb was developed by selecting open-pollinated seed, so that its precise origin is almost impossible to determine. In appearance, samples of culinary rhubarb vary on a continuum between R. rhaponticum and R. rhabarbarum. However, modern rhubarb cultivars are tetraploids with 2n = 44, in contrast to 2n = 22 for the wild species.

Although rhubarb is a vegetable, it is often put to the same culinary uses as fruits. The leaf stalks can be used raw, when they have a crisp texture (similar to celery, although it is in a different family), but are most commonly cooked with sugar and used in pies, crumbles and other desserts. They have a strong, tart taste. Many cultivars have been developed for human consumption, most of which are recognised as Rheum × hybridum by the Royal Horticultural Society.

Rhubarb (Wiktionary)

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɹuːbɑːb/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɹuˌbɑɹb/
  • Hyphenation: rhu‧barb

Etymology 1

From Middle English rubarbe, from Anglo-Norman reubarbe (modern French rhubarbe), from Late Latin reubarbarum, rheubarbarum, rubarbera, rybarba, probably from Koine Greek ῥῆον βάρβαρον (rhêon bárbaron), from

...
« Retour à l'index du glossaire
Article précédentTopinambur
Article suivantBlé dur