Estragon

Estragon (Artemisia dracunculus), également connu sous le nom d'estragon, une espèce d'herbe vivace de la famille du tournesol

Artemisia dracunculus

Synonymes :
Estragon
Tarragon (Wikipedia)

Tarragon
Estragon 1511.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Clade:Asterids
Order:Asterales
Family:Asteraceae
Genus:Artemisia
Species:
A. dracunculus
Binomial name
Artemisia dracunculus
L. not Hook.f. 1881
Synonyms
Synonymy
  • Achillea dracunculus Hort. ex Steud.
  • Artemisia aromatica A.Nelson
  • Artemisia cernua Nutt.
  • Artemisia changaica Krasch.
  • Artemisia dracunculoides Pursh
  • Artemisia glauca Pall. ex Willd.
  • Artemisia inodora Hook. & Arn.
  • Artemisia inodora Willd.
  • Artemisia nutans Pursh
  • Artemisia nuttalliana Besser
  • Artemisia redowskyi Ledeb.
  • Draconia dracunculus (L.) Soják
  • Dracunculus esculentus Garsault
  • Oligosporus dracunculiformis (Krasch.) Poljakov
  • Oligosporus dracunculus (L.) Poljakov
  • Oligosporus glaucus (Pall. ex Willd.) Poljakov
  • Artemisia dracunculina S.Watson

Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), also known as estragon, is a species of perennial herb in the sunflower family. It is widespread in the wild across much of Eurasia and North America, and is cultivated for culinary and medicinal purposes.

One subspecies, Artemisia dracunculus var. sativa, is cultivated for use of the leaves as an aromatic culinary herb. In some other subspecies, the characteristic aroma is largely absent. The species is polymorphic. Informal names for distinguishing the variations include "French tarragon" (best for culinary use), "Russian tarragon", and "wild tarragon" (covers various states).

Tarragon grows to 120–150 centimetres (4–5 feet) tall, with slender branches. The leaves are lanceolate, 2–8 cm (1–3 in) long and2–10 mm (1838 in) broad, glossy green, with an entire margin. The flowers are produced in small capitula2–4 mm (116316 in) diameter, each capitulum containing up to 40 yellow or greenish-yellow florets. French tarragon, however, seldom produces any flowers (or seeds). Some tarragon plants produce seeds that are generally sterile. Others produce viable seeds. Tarragon has rhizomatous roots that it uses to spread and readily reproduce.

Tarragon (Wiktionary)

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French targon (cf. modern estragon), from Medieval Latin tragonia, from Arabic طَرْخُون(ṭarḵūn), ultimately from Ancient Greek δρακόντιον (drakóntion, edder-wort, Dracunculus vulgaris), from δράκων (drákōn, dragon, serpent).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Marymarrymerry distinction) IPA(key): /ˈtæɹəɡɑn/, /ˈtæɹəɡən/
  • (General American,
...
« Retour à l'index du glossaire
Article précédentTournesol
Article suivantThym