Thym

Bouquet de thym frais sur de vieilles planches de bois rustiques

Thymus vulgaris

Synonymes :
Bai Li Xiang
Thymus_vulgaris (Wikipedia)

Thymus vulgaris
Thymus vulgaris1.JPG
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Tracheophytes
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Eudicots
Clade:Asterids
Order:Lamiales
Family:Lamiaceae
Genus:Thymus
Species:
T. vulgaris
Binomial name
Thymus vulgaris
Flowering thyme

Thymus vulgaris (common thyme, German thyme, garden thyme or just thyme) is a species of flowering plant in the mint family Lamiaceae, native to southern Europe from the western Mediterranean to southern Italy. Growing to 15–30 cm (6–12 in) tall by 40 cm (16 in) wide, it is a bushy, woody-based evergreen subshrub with small, highly aromatic, grey-green leaves and clusters of purple or pink flowers in early summer.

It is useful in the garden as groundcover, where it can be short-lived, but is easily propagated from cuttings. It is also the main source of thyme as an ingredient in cooking and as an herbal medicine. It is slightly spicier than oregano and sweeter than sage.

A shoot of a common thyme plant in the wild (Castelltallat)

The Latin specific epithet vulgaris means “common” in the sense of “widespread”.

Thyme (Wiktionary)

English

Etymology

From Middle English tyme, from Old French thym, from Latin thymum, from Ancient Greek θύμον (thúmon).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /taɪm/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm
  • Homophone: time

Noun

thyme (countable and uncountable, plural thymes)

  1. Any plant of the labiate genus Thymus, such as the garden thyme, Thymus vulgaris, a warm, pungent aromatic, that is much used to give a relish to seasoning and soups.

Usage notes

  • In older Irish and British poems and songs
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