Here are 5 trees you need to be able to find at your local Garden Center or Tree Nursery to help to attract butterflies. Choose these trees for your landscape and enjoy the visit of a pletora of butterflies in your garden.

European Birdcherry Tree

European Birdcherry Tree (Prunus padus) Zones 3-6; This tree is easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It’s adaptable to a wide array of soils. This tree is a deciduous ornamental cherry tree which generally develops 20-40′ tall with a rounded crown. It’s fragrant white flowers in 3-6″ long clusters which look after the foliage emerges in spring. The blossoms are followed by pea-sized, black cherries which ripen in mid-summer. This tree is closely-related into the chokecherry and the fruit is very bitter to people but the birds love it. The leaves turn yellow in the autumn.

Yoshingo Cherry Tree

Yoshingo Cherry Tree ( Prunus x yedoensis yoshino) Zones 5-8; This shrub grows in average, moderate moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. However, it will do the finest in full sun. It tolerates heat and humidity well, but is sensitive to drought conditions. It’s adaptable to a wide array of soils. This cherry tree is a graceful ornamental flowering cherry tree which typically grows 30-40′ tall with a spreading, broad-rounded, open crown. Fragrant white (sometimes tinged pink) flowers in 3 to 6-flowered clusters appear in a profuse and spectacular early spring bloom. Flowers are followed by small black cherries (1/2″ diameter) which are bitter to people but loved by birds. Foliage turns yellow and with bronze tints in autumn. The spring flowers are the trees best decorative feature; and are an outstanding little to medium-sized tree for lawns, along roads, adjacent to patios or decks.

Little-leaf Linden

Little-Leaf Linden (Tilia cordata) Zones 3-7; This tree is easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It prefers moist, fertile, well-drained loams, but adheres to a broad array of soil conditions. Good tolerance for urban problems. Tolerant of heavy pruning, and could be grown as a hedge. Native to Europe, the littleleaf linden was implanted in the U. S. as an ornamental shade tree because of its attractive foliage, dense, low-branched, pyramidal to ovate shape and its tolerance for urban problems. Ornamental features include fragrant pale yellow flowers in late spring, small nutlets with connected leafy wings (to 3.5″ long) and ovate, shiny dark green leaves (to 3″ long). This is a medium to large deciduous tree, typically growing to 50-70′ (less often to 100′) tall. It’s fragrant, creamy yellow flowers in drooping cymes look in June. When a tree is in full bloom, bees frequently visit in these abundant numbers that humming could be heard many feet in the tree. The flowers give way to nutlets which are attached to narrow bract-like wings (top 3.5″ long). The autumn color is an undistinguished light green to light yellow. This is a excellent shade, yard, or street tree and from a landscaping standpoint many consider this species to be the best of lindens.

European Linden

European Linden (Tilia x europaea) Zones 3-7; This tree is easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It Prefers moist, fertile, well-drained loams, but adheres to a broad array of soil conditions and has a fantastic tolerance for urban problems. Immediately eliminate root suckers as they appear. The European linden is a hybrid cross between two native European lindens (T. cordata x T. platyphyllos). It’s perhaps most like its T. platyphyllos parent, that’s the tree commemorated by Franz Schubert in Der Lindenbaum (The Linden Tree). This hybrid is a medium to large deciduous tree, typically growing to 50-70′ (less often to 120′) tall with a broad-columnar habit. It’s fragrant pale yellow flowers that appear in late spring. When a tree is in full bloom, bees frequently visit in these abundant numbers that humming could be heard many feet in the tree. The flowers are followed by small nutlets attached to narrow, bract-like, strap-shaped leafy wings (to 4.5″ long). The Nutlets ripen in late summer. Fall color is an undistinguished light green to light yellow.

Silver Linden

Silver Linden (Tilia tomentosa) Zones 4-7; This Tree is easily grown in average, dry to medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It prefers moist, fertile, well-drained loams, but adheres to a broad array of soil conditions. Best drought resistance of some of the lindens. Good tolerance for urban problems. The silver linden or European white linden is known for its attractive foliage, which is glossy green above and silvery-white below. The foliage flutters at the slightest breeze, showcasing the green and silver foliage colours. This is a medium to large deciduous tree, typically growing to 50-70′ (less often to 100′) tall with upright branching and a broad-columnar habit. It develops fragrant pale yellow flowers in late spring to early summer (June-July). This tree is also known to attract bees. The flowers are followed by small nutlets attached to narrow, strap-shaped leafy wings (to 2.5″ long). Fall color is an undistinguished light green to light yellow.